Some Words on: Weight Gain on Psychoactive Medication

It is, very sadly, true. Using psychiatric medication often leads to substantial and rapid weight gain. When I was first put on an antipsychotic, which was Olanzapine (Zyprexa), I gained over thirty pounds in a matter of just a few months. After switching to Quetiapine (Seroquel), my weight stopped going up, and through a healthier diet I even managed to shed some of it, but I never went back to what used to be my normal weight. Now, I am constantly teetering on the edge of overweight. My BMI (Body mass Index) oscillates between 24.9 (which is borderline acceptable) and 25.1 (overweight). In addition to the weight, my entire body texture seems to have changed. Even without regular exercise, I used to be athletic and lean by nature. Now, I have cellulitis bumps on different parts of my body and look slightly out of shape. The only good thing about being fuller is that also my boobs have grown by one cup size. I’ve gone from A to B. This is not to say that you should try psychoactive drugs as a measure of breast enlargement. Absolutely don’t do it! Fact is, these medications mess with your metabolism on top of potentially messing with your mind and with all sorts of biological functions. So no games, please! Every now and then, marketing of psychiatric drugs includes enthusiastic statements like “does not cause weight gain” (the atypical antipsychotic Aripiprazole, aka Abilify, for example), which are to increase their attractiveness among the target group. This, more than anything, shows how common weight gain is as a side effect of these substances.

But what if you are already there? Is there any way of losing the pounds? First of all, it is important to remember that diets and exercise regimes which work fine on people who do not use psychiatric drugs, won’t be as efficient on someone who does. Weight loss will likely be slow and unspectacular. It is not impossible, but it is harder to achieve. Still, you should not feel discouraged. Both a healthy diet and regular workouts will boost your overall health and help you stabilize your mood. In fact, exercise has been found to be highly effective against depression. Also, physical activity offers a great opportunity for leaving the isolation of your four walls, getting among people, breathing some invigorating fresh air and catching lovely sunlight for some extra vitamin D. If sports and healthy eating habits fail to lower your BMI in a direct way, they can still contribute to it by making you less in need of medication. Both are, in any case, worth the effort.

If you decide to diet, do it responsibly. Please do not embark on a starvation course. Your body and mind need their nutrients, especially when your health is already compromised. Put together a balanced nutrition plan rich in fresh vegetables, fiber, “good” fats (red fish, avocado, nuts, etc.), protein and fruit. Avoid processed foods, refined sugars and carbs, sodium laden snacks and in general anything that reeks of junk food. Also, abstain from artificial sweeteners, preservatives or colorants. If you are on psychiatric medication, you are already consuming potent and potentially dangerous chemicals. Try not to add even more through your food.  As a rule of thumb, note that the less processed – or the more natural – a food is, the better. As for drinks: have no sodas; just water, teas and smoothies without added sugar. It is not necessary to take radical measures like turning vegan or saying goodbye to dairy products. If you associate the concept of healthy eating with a bunch of barefoot, skinny tree-huggers gnawing on raw carrots and celery, then you will need to reeducate yourself. Healthy eating means experiencing real food with real flavors made of real ingredients. Subsisting mainly on junk food is neither cool, nor manly, nor useful. Knowing what it can do to you, it is plain stupid and a waste of money, time and life. For those who sustain that “Junk food is so much cheaper”: Buying sodas and fries may save you a dollar in the moment, but an extra expense for whole foods can save you hundreds, if not thousands of dollars in medical treatment and work incapacity in the long run. I am not saying you should never set foot in a fast food restaurant again. I myself do it on rare occasions, and when I am at a party where a decadent buffet is winking at me… what the heck, I am at a party! So, be naughty every once in a while, but never let highly processed foods become a staple in your diet.

Nowadays, most foods are, first and foremost, designed to please our taste buds. The real purpose of food, which is to provide nutrition, is presented as a collateral benefit by the food industry. Creaminess, fluffiness, sweetness, crunchiness – all these are prioritized over nutritious value in food marketing. Most often, the “healthy”-tag is just another means of selling you virtual garbage as nutrition. Milk chocolate contains milk, which contains calcium, which is good for you. So, chocolate bars are healthy, eat as many as you like! Having been exposed to this type of discourses since childhood, many consumers have never developed a clear idea about what food actually is. They would never expect their car to run on soap water, but they do expect their own bodies and minds to run on meals and snacks devoid of nutrients. In other words, they eat things that are, in fact, not food at all. Popular wisdom such as “sugar is energy” or “if I feel full, then I have given my body what it needs” is completely misleading. You can feel stuffed after having eaten a shoe sole. Yet, your organism will get nothing out of it. You can fill a car tank with soap water – until it spills over, actually! It will no doubt be full, yet the car won’t run.

Nobody knows exactly how much damage our trashy diet is doing to us. We are likely to have seen barely the tip of the iceberg so far. Probably, more physical ailments, mental conditions and cognitive disabilities are a result of intoxication and deficiencies induced by our diet than we can fathom at this moment in time. Mainstream eating habits and ruthless food marketing have created a paradoxical scenario. People who consume processed foods can be morbidly obese and still malnourished. You can eat monstrous amounts of calories and still be dangerously deficient on nutrients. Many diets out there are just as much of a health threat as our trashy eating habits. Dieting is often misunderstood as selective starvation. The idea behind it is that achieving a lower weight will supposedly make you healthier. Every new issue of any women’s magazine will promote another grotesque diet, and each time it is advertised as finally being the real thing to get you into lollypop-shape in no time. Having only apple cider vinegar with chili powder for two weeks in a row while keeping your habitual level of activity should definitely make you lose a few pounds. But will it make you healthier? And remember, you are (likely) not a celebrity! You have no millions to spend on personal nutritionists, private doctors and plastic surgeons to patch you back up again. Celebrity diets can be survived only by celebrities.

So, masochistic dieting will not result in a healthy weight, but only being healthy will. In other words, the first thing you want to do is establish optimum health. You need to get rid of toxins, balance your hormones and provide your organism with the necessary nutrients. Reformulate your eating habits into a plan that leaves out damaging food products and embraces whole foods. And don’t worry: whole foods are at least as delicious as processed and prepared food. You will be astonished at the mind boggling variety in flavors, textures and colors nature offers you. No junk food can ever keep up with that.

If you are using psychiatric drugs, in addition to following a healthy diet you will need to make an extra effort in detoxing your metabolism and achieving hormonal balance. Very likely, your liver is working overtime to process the substances you are using. Give it a hand by consuming liver-cleansing foods and drinks. Mostly, that is going to be certain vegetables and teas. Cruciferous, slightly bitter veggies such as broccoli, kale, Brussels sprouts and cauliflower should be staples for you. In fact, cauliflower is incredibly multifaceted. It can be made into low-carb pizza dough, lasagna, hash browns and many other delicious dishes. Another advantage of vegetables is that you can practically eat as much as you like of them without putting your health at risk. Which other food allows for that? So, enjoy your greens! As for drinks, you can have freshly pressed lemon juice mixed with pure water, veggie smoothies and organic green tea. Many websites will also promote grapefruit juice as liver-cleansing, which is correct. However, remember that grapefruit can interact with your medication, so please abstain from consuming it in any form. There are more than enough safe options for you out there. For further inspiration, you can also browse health food stores for liver-cleansing herbal tea blends.

When you put together your new diet, there are three factors which determine what you will be eating: what your body needs, what you should avoid and what you like. If you keep an open mind, these three need not clash. Don’t be afraid to try out recipes you had not known yet. This is also a good moment for having yourself checked for food allergies. Give your eating plan a thorough clean-up! As a result, you may have to quit a number of eating habits, but you will also discover a wealth of new options to compensate for those. And always remember to go for the fresh and natural! Now, keep in mind you won’t drop three sizes overnight. Although your medication-induced weight may be bothering you, its loss is not your primary goal! Your primary goal is to become healthier and strengthen your body and mind. As a secondary effect, weight loss is likely to follow an improved overall health.

Websites:

For those who prefer a conventional approach to weight-loss, turn to www.weightwatchers.com or www.weightwatchers.co.uk.

Articles:

This post from the blog beyondmeds.com deals with the author´s personal experience with weight gain on psychiatric medication and weight loss after coming off the drugs: http://beyondmeds.com/2012/08/06/weight-psych-meds/ You may want to have a look at the rest of the blog, too. It is elaborate and full of valuable articles.

Here is a blog article in English by athlete Cathy Brown on how she successfully managed her depression and her anger issues through exercise: http://www.changingmindschanginglives.com/2013/05/sport-changed-my-life-for-the-better/

Audiovisuals:

Seminar on the functioning of the liver in English by nutritionist Barbara O’Neill: http://youtu.be/KAGEhkZ-ssY Should you wish to find out more about O’Neill, visit her website at http://www.barbhealth.com/.

Dr. Eric Berg has developed a nutritional theory based on different metabolic types. According to Berg, every person corresponds to at least one of these types. As a consequence, different individuals metabolize food in varying ways and function at their healthiest on different food plans. Berg does not refer to the added complication of psychiatric drug use, but still his discourse offers fascinating and useful insights. To learn more, watch the following videos in English:

Dr. Berg’s Body Type Seminar: http://youtu.be/_m-R4RqRQqM

The Body Type Diets – What to Eat for Each Type: http://youtu.be/xvOwfkg9p2o

If you are interested in more of Dr. Berg’s theory, go to http://www.drberg.com/

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6 thoughts on “Some Words on: Weight Gain on Psychoactive Medication

  1. Hallo,
    ohne deine Erfahrungen in irgendeiner Weise in Frage stellen zu wollen (zumal ich mein Fastübergewicht auf zwei Schwangerschaften und schlicht zu viel Essen zurückführen kann/muss), muss man leider dazu sagen, dass sobald Frau die Mitte Dreißig überschritten hat, jedes verdammte Gramm anhänglicher ist als der schlimmste Stalker und die Topographie der Oberschenkel jeden Buckelpistenliebhaber die Freudentränen in die Augen treibt. Das Sinnvollste wäre es, sich damit anzufreunden, denn man wird das Gewicht genauso wenig wieder los, wie den ständig nachwachsenden Dreckwäscheberg (der zuverlässigste Freund der Hausfrau – immer da, ob man ihn braucht oder nicht), auch wenn man viel mehr Sport treibt als früher und sich tausendmal gesünder ernährt, dank Oberherrschaft und -verantwortung über die Familienernährung.
    Ich gebe zu, am Aufbau dieser Freundschaft arbeite ich noch. Ich habe irgendwie noch nicht die richtige innere Einstellung gefunden, schließlich pflege ich bisher die besten Freundschaften mit Leuten, die verdammt weit weg wohnen, diese körperliche Nähe bin ich einfach nicht gewohnt 🙂
    Liebe Grüße!

    • For those of you whose German is a bit spotty, Monika commented that upon reaching the mid-thirties weight gain is quite usual in a woman, and so is the difficulty in getting rid of it. She is right. The older you get, the harder it is to stay in shape, especially if you have a tight schedule of obligations (job, family, etc.). The use of psychiatric medication exacerbates that problem significantly, though. It can also be assumed that in addition to the metabolic impact of the drugs, the social isolation that often goes hand in hand with mental illness, including periods of hospitalization, leads to a more sedentary lifestyle. As a result, someone taking psychotropic medication may have a number of factors working against them.

      • Oh, by the way, Monika is actually the FIRST person to post a comment on my blog! I suppose that’s worth a little present! Monika, send me your address in a private message and you’ll get a freeby! Tadah! 😀

  2. Pingback: When Meds Get in The Way | Getting off - A Life without Psychiatric Medication?

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